united nations – Athena Site http://athenasite.net/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 16:34:17 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://athenasite.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-1-120x120.png united nations – Athena Site http://athenasite.net/ 32 32 Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator, Ms. Joyce Msuya, Briefing to the Security Council on the humanitarian situation in Syria, 25 February 2022 – Syrian Arab Republic https://athenasite.net/assistant-secretary-general-for-humanitarian-affairs-and-deputy-emergency-relief-coordinator-ms-joyce-msuya-briefing-to-the-security-council-on-the-humanitarian-situation-in-syria-25-february-2022/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 17:04:37 +0000 https://athenasite.net/assistant-secretary-general-for-humanitarian-affairs-and-deputy-emergency-relief-coordinator-ms-joyce-msuya-briefing-to-the-security-council-on-the-humanitarian-situation-in-syria-25-february- Thank you, Mister President. This is my first briefing to this Council as Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator. I look forward to engaging closely with all of you. A few days ago, the United Nations and its humanitarian partners released our evidence-based assessment of humanitarian needs in the Syrian Arab Republic for the coming year. The […]]]>

Thank you,

Mister President.

This is my first briefing to this Council as Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator. I look forward to engaging closely with all of you.

A few days ago, the United Nations and its humanitarian partners released our evidence-based assessment of humanitarian needs in the Syrian Arab Republic for the coming year.

The conclusions are clear. And they paint a very bleak picture.

More people are in need than at any time since the conflict began. A total of 14.6 million people will depend on humanitarian aid.

This is 9% more than last year and 32% more than the previous year.

The world is failing the Syrian people. This cannot be our strategy.

Mister President,

Hostilities, mainly along the front lines, continue to cause civilian casualties and damage to essential civilian infrastructure, such as hospitals, schools and water supply facilities. Some 40 other civilians were killed in January alone.

Mines and explosive devices cause other deaths, including the lives of children.

Hostilities also restrict freedom of movement. This, in turn, puts women and children at greater risk of abuse.

Mister President,

As we saw last month with the attack on a prison in Al Hasakah, we continue to see the incredibly precarious situation of hundreds of children who remain in detention centers and camps. They should never have been there in the first place. They need protection. They need services. And they need hope for the future. It is high time to act.

Mister President,

Syria now ranks among the 10 most food insecure countries in the world, with 12 million people considered food insecure.

The Syrian economy continues its downward spiral. Food is getting more and more expensive and people are going hungry.

Over the past year, the cost of feeding a family of five for a month on just the most basic items has nearly doubled.

A household today spends on average 50% more than it earns. To get by, families have to borrow money with little hope of repaying those loans.

This follows a trend of an ever-increasing financial burden on families.

And that forces them to make unbearable choices.

Children, especially girls, are taken out of school. Child marriages are on the rise.

Female-headed households, older people without family support, people with disabilities and children are disproportionately affected.

Mister President,

We are scaling up early recovery programs this year – I know USG Griffiths has also informed you of this recently. Our 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan is about to be finalized, and we expect around a quarter of the total appeal will be directed towards increasing resilience and access to basic services – a significant increase from compared to last year.

We will focus in part on revitalizing access to certain basic services, such as water.

But we need more support, and we count on the generosity of donors to achieve this. The positive facilitation of different parts of our efforts is essential.

Mister President,

Millions of people in northwestern Syria depend on our support to survive.

The winter has made people’s suffering worse, especially for the millions of people living in tents.

Through our cross-border operations, we deliver food, medicine and other essentials every month. We support the delivery of essential services.

We do all of this in a transparent and principled manner.

Last year, we also expanded access to northwest Syria by restarting cross-cutting operations.

In December and January, after a new distribution system was put in place, cross-cutting aid began to reach people in need.

We have a plan in place for additional deliveries. We are ready to move.

What we need now is the support of all parties involved to enable these cross-cutting missions to move forward.

Let me reiterate, however, that there is no alternative in place today that can match the scale and scope of the massive United Nations cross-border operation, providing food, vaccines and other life-saving aid to 2.4 million people.

Mister President,

Syrians have suffered for so long. They deserve a better future.

They now need help to survive, but that shouldn’t be the case.

They need a chance to build a dignified life for themselves and their families.

And they must be able to give their children hope for a better future.

To achieve this, we need sustainable and reliable access. We need more funding. And we must scale up early recovery programs alongside our rescue work.

But above all, the Syrians need peace.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

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Joyce Msuya becomes Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator – World https://athenasite.net/joyce-msuya-becomes-under-secretary-general-for-humanitarian-affairs-and-deputy-emergency-relief-coordinator-world/ Thu, 10 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://athenasite.net/joyce-msuya-becomes-under-secretary-general-for-humanitarian-affairs-and-deputy-emergency-relief-coordinator-world/ New York, February 10, 2022: Joyce Msuya, of the United Republic of Tanzania, joins today as Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator in the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). Ms Msuya succeeds Ursula Mueller of Germany, who had held the position until February 2020. In the […]]]>

New York, February 10, 2022: Joyce Msuya, of the United Republic of Tanzania, joins today as Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator in the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Ms Msuya succeeds Ursula Mueller of Germany, who had held the position until February 2020. In the meantime, Ramesh Rajasingham had served as Acting Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs.

Ms. Msuya brings over 20 years of experience in international development and finance, spanning strategy, operations and partnerships, and with various assignments in Africa, Asia and Latin America.

Since 2018, Ms Msuya has served as Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) in Nairobi, Kenya. Between 2018 and 2019, she served as Acting Executive Director of UNEP at the Under-Secretary-General level, leading the fourth session of the United Nations Environment Assembly and mobilizing resources to support its mission.

Ms. Msuya has held several senior positions within the World Bank Group, including Special Representative and Head of Office of the World Bank Group in the Republic of Korea, Regional Coordinator at the World Bank Institute, based in China, and Special Advisor to the then Senior Vice President and Chief Economist of the World Bank. She also led the International Finance Corporation’s strategy and operations in Africa and Latin America, covering the manufacturing, agribusiness and services sectors.

Ms. Msuya holds an MSc in Microbiology and Immunology from the University of Ottawa, Canada, a BSc in Biochemistry and Immunology from the University of Strathclyde, Scotland, and management certifications and in public health from Harvard Business School and Johns Hopkins University. .

Ms. Msuya is fluent in English, Swahili and Pare, and speaks Mandarin. She is married and has two children.

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Retirement of CARICOM Deputy Secretary General – Eye Witness News https://athenasite.net/retirement-of-caricom-deputy-secretary-general-eye-witness-news/ Mon, 07 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://athenasite.net/retirement-of-caricom-deputy-secretary-general-eye-witness-news/ NASSAU, BAHAMAS – The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, on behalf of the Prime Minister and the citizens of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, has expressed its sincere gratitude and appreciation to Ambassador Colin Granderson, former Assistant Secretary General of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) , for his excellent service as a career diplomat and for the […]]]>

NASSAU, BAHAMAS – The Ministry of Foreign Affairs, on behalf of the Prime Minister and the citizens of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas, has expressed its sincere gratitude and appreciation to Ambassador Colin Granderson, former Assistant Secretary General of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) , for his excellent service as a career diplomat and for the many contributions and sacrifices he has made to regional integration in the Caribbean.

The ministry also thanked Granderson for his 45-year diplomatic tenure, which began in Trinidad and Tobago’s Foreign Service before he later held positions at the United Nations Mission in Africa and the United Nations. of U.S. states in the Republic of Haiti before becoming the chief foreign policy official. adviser for CARICOM.

In a statement, the ministry said, “He is considered one of the Caribbean’s leading experts in human rights monitoring and peacebuilding/peacekeeping.

“Ambassador Granderson is also well known for his passionate approach to foreign policy issues (health, education and disaster management) and for his leadership and expertise regarding Haiti and the wider Caribbean region.

“His insights and contributions at the regional level will be greatly missed.

“The Foreign Office wishes him the best for his retirement and future plans.”

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Sudan: Statement by Assistant Secretary Molly Phee Office of African Affairs U.S. Department of State – Senate Foreign Relations Committee https://athenasite.net/sudan-statement-by-assistant-secretary-molly-phee-office-of-african-affairs-u-s-department-of-state-senate-foreign-relations-committee/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 02:26:26 +0000 https://athenasite.net/sudan-statement-by-assistant-secretary-molly-phee-office-of-african-affairs-u-s-department-of-state-senate-foreign-relations-committee/ Mr. Chairman, Member at Large, allow me to begin by thanking the committee for your interest and longstanding support for a successful transition from authoritarian to civilian rule in Sudan. We share your concern about the increasingly volatile situation and the risk of regression. Since the fall of Bashir’s dictatorship in 2019, the United States […]]]>

Mr. Chairman, Member at Large, allow me to begin by thanking the committee for your interest and longstanding support for a successful transition from authoritarian to civilian rule in Sudan. We share your concern about the increasingly volatile situation and the risk of regression. Since the fall of Bashir’s dictatorship in 2019, the United States and our international partners have worked to support the people of Sudan in their extraordinary efforts to build democracy. We have worked closely with this Committee and the Congress to advance this shared priority.

RELATED: US Senate Hearing on Sudan’s Opening Remarks

It has always been an ambitious undertaking. After 30 years of Islamist military dictatorship and recurrent internal conflicts, the Sudanese face a legacy marked by a military-dominated economy now threatened with collapse, a civil service denuded following repeated political purges, a political system fractured by military intervention to shatter and divide, and the generational damage done to the country’s historical marginalized is such as Darfur which left hundreds of thousands dead, millions displaced and the nation split in two. Even as we salute the transitional government’s progress in repealing repressive legislation that restricted human rights, opening space for civil society and political activism, ending support from decades of government to terrorist organizations and engagement in free-market economic reforms, we were keenly aware of the immense structural problems facing the transition, compounded by internal power struggles and external detractors.

We were also inspired by the remarkable and resilient civil resistance movement, which achieved the historic overthrow of Bashir and led the security forces to agree in 2019 on a transitional civil-military partnership and a path towards the elections known as the Constitutional Declaration. Sudanese stakeholders also reached a landmark transitional power-sharing agreement for historically marginalized regions known as the 2020 Juba Peace Agreement. These two documents offered the promise of finally achieving democracy and thus peace. for Sudan. We were proud to work with Congress and our international partners to leverage our diplomacy and assistance to support this transition, which holds so much promise for the Sudanese people, the region and the continent.

On October 25, as we all know, the Sudanese security services turned the civil-military partnership upside down when they betrayed the transition and the people of Sudan by directly seizing power – overthrowing the prime minister and the cabinet and undermining the confidence of the Sudanese people in the promise of the transition and the goodwill of the international community. The November 21 political agreement that restored Prime Minister Hamdok to office failed because it did not include key civilian stakeholders and did not permanently end military repression and violence against civil protests. Prime Minister Hamdok’s decision to step down on January 2 shocked the Sudanese political system and prompted civilian and military actors to seek help from the international community to save the transition.

Given the repeated disturbing actions of the Sudanese security services, the people of Sudan have concluded that it is no longer realistic to view Sudan’s transition as a partnership with the military. Declaration and the Juba Peace Agreement to ensure that these policy documents reflect the needs of the present moment. To do this, Sudanese stakeholders are demanding a new military-civilian relationship, one that redefines and resizes the role of the military from partner in a transitional government to participant in the transitional process. For our part, we have made it clear that we support civilians in achieving this ambition and will act to facilitate this change.

Sudanese stakeholders from all military and political backgrounds tell us that they are seeking to return to a transition, but would welcome international support to help them find common ground. Sudan-led political process, the international community has begun to work actively with Sudanese civilian stakeholders to build consensus around a common vision for reform of the constitutional declaration in order to reshape the path of civilian transition, d assign an appropriate participatory role to the security services, set up a Legislative Council and lay the necessary foundations to advance elections, economic reforms, accountability and the implementation of the Juba Peace Agreement.

Mandated by the Security Council to use its good offices in favor of the transition, UNITAMS will be in the lead but not alone. The United States, together with Friends of Sudan (Canada, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, Kuwait, Netherlands, Norway, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, the United States, the African Union, the European Union, the League of Arab States and the United Nations) – pledged our full support for the process facilitated by the UNITAMS. We did so with full recognition of the difficult work facing the Sudanese and their regional and international partners. Successful democratic transitions require broad agreement among multiple stakeholders in the capital and across the country. It will take the contribution of many people to meet this daunting challenge. We stand ready not only to provide diplomatic and financial support to this effort, but also to work closely with UNITAMS leadership and key international partners – in particular the African Union, European Union and Saudi Arabia. – to shape this process to ensure that it is time-bound and produces concrete results.

During my two visits to Sudan, civilian and military actors expressed a strong desire to find a way out of the quagmire that has plagued the country since the October 25 military coup. Although they pledged to support the political process facilitated by UNITAMS, these promises must be honored by deeds, in particular on the part of the security services. On behalf of the United States, I have made it clear that the continuing reprehensible pattern of violence against peaceful protesters that the security services have engaged in since October 25 must end. The same goes for the use of detentions of civil society activists, media shutdowns, attacks on medical facilities and communication blackouts. These actions perpetuate a cycle of violence that hardens positions and makes it all the more difficult to agree on a political path forward.

We have already worked with our partners in the international community to impose significant costs on the Sudanese military regime for its actions on October 25. The pause in bilateral and multilateral government aid and debt relief has left the country’s finances in a precarious state, unable to meet its current financial obligations. We have been clear that the only path to the restoration of international financial assistance is based on an end to violence and the restoration of democratic transition.

At the same time, as I have made clear to military leaders, we stand ready, together with our partners, to apply additional costs if the current pattern of violence continues. We are currently examining the full range of traditional and non-traditional tools at our disposal in order to further reduce the funds available to the Sudanese military regime, isolate its military-controlled companies and increase reputational risk for anyone who chooses to continue to engage in “business as usual” with the Sudanese security services and their economic enterprises. Smart use of this leverage will enable us to push for behavioral change on the part of security sector leaders and could contribute to establishing the military-civilian balance of power in Sudan, a prerequisite to the long-term success of its democracy.