long term – Athena Site http://athenasite.net/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 16:35:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://athenasite.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-1-120x120.png long term – Athena Site http://athenasite.net/ 32 32 Park City Marketplace – Assistant Manager https://athenasite.net/park-city-marketplace-assistant-manager/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 18:23:19 +0000 https://athenasite.net/park-city-marketplace-assistant-manager/ Join our award-winning team. Cox Tire and Auto is proud to provide top-notch automotive care to the Park City community. Cox Tire and Auto Service Assistant Manager Duties include (but are not limited to): • Greeting all customers • Answering phones and scheduling appointments • Taking payments • Creating accurate quotes and ordering needed parts […]]]>

Join our award-winning team. Cox Tire and Auto is proud to provide top-notch automotive care to the Park City community. Cox Tire and Auto Service Assistant Manager Duties include (but are not limited to): • Greeting all customers • Answering phones and scheduling appointments • Taking payments • Creating accurate quotes and ordering needed parts • Demonstrating behaviors consistent with the company’s core values ​​in all interactions with customers, colleagues and suppliers. • Clearly report all vehicle symptoms as described by the customer and transfer them to a work order. • Explain work required, work completed and charges to clients. • Coordinate automotive repair and maintenance services to achieve maximum utilization of personnel and facilities • Monitor the progress of each vehicle throughout the day and keep customers informed • Maximize and maintain workshop efficiency • Adhere to organizational policies and procedures and goals, objectives, conferring with owners, team or peers as needed. • Manage the safety and well-being of all store employees and customers. • Build long-term client relationships based on trust, honesty, integrity and exceptional work. • Attend training as needed. Job requirements: • Solid experience in the automotive industry. • At least 1 year in management • Proven leadership skills • Ability to prioritize required services • Exceptional organizational and multi-tasking ability. • Excellent verbal communication skills • Ability to explain complex automotive concepts to customers who may not be familiar with industry technology. • Current Utah driver’s license • Computer literate • Sales experience • Good energy and positive attitude • Enjoy working with the public • Strong drive to constantly improve • Ability to lift 50 pounds • Problem solving skills • A basic understanding of business management is a plus • ASE Certified is a plus • Reliable transportation • Legally authorized to work in the USA • Background check will be required. Opening hours: Monday to Friday from 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. NO WEEKENDS!

Kyle
Position status: Full time
Experience Level: Some experience required
How to Apply: Please email your resume to: kyle@coxtireandauto.com or drop by with your resume and introduce yourself.

www.coxtireandauto.com

location
Park City, UT 84098
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Sale and England to discuss center management after Six Nations https://athenasite.net/sale-and-england-to-discuss-center-management-after-six-nations/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 07:34:00 +0000 https://athenasite.net/sale-and-england-to-discuss-center-management-after-six-nations/ Credit: PA Images Sale Sharks plan to meet England after the Six Nations to find a managerial solution for Manu Tuilagi in light of his latest injury. Tuilagi was forced out of England’s starting line-up against Wales after straining his hamstring and it left him in doubt for the game against Ireland at the weekend […]]]>

Credit: PA Images

Sale Sharks plan to meet England after the Six Nations to find a managerial solution for Manu Tuilagi in light of his latest injury.

Tuilagi was forced out of England’s starting line-up against Wales after straining his hamstring and it left him in doubt for the game against Ireland at the weekend next.

Commercial director of rugby Alex Sanderson believes the England center could potentially feature in the competition’s final clash against France.

Sanderson said he wanted a joint approach with England to ensure Tuilagi’s long-term fitness.

Prone to injury

The 30-year-old has been plagued by injuries throughout his career and is yet to fully recover from his hamstring tear suffered against South Africa in November.

Sanderson’s concern is not with England’s handling of Tuilagi – club and country are in close contact over his loading – but with ensuring the long-term availability of their prized asset.

“It was probably just a little too far, a little too soon. We spoke to Eddie and liaised with physios and S&C staff in England,” Sanderson said.

“We are all on the same page and need to catch up post-Six Nations to understand how we can potentially manage it better.

“But we’re struggling to see how we can at the moment, other than it’s too soon.

“You can look and dive into things and go down rabbit holes, but sometimes you can see ghosts that aren’t actually there. It’s important to understand that.

“The reason we want to sit together is concern for the player. It’s not about gray areas. I just want us to be on the same page.

“There are traces of email and phone calls. Everyone talks to everyone. There are probably seven, eight or nine conversations going on at the same time. For me, it’s better if everyone is in the same room.

“There is only one Manu Tuilagi and we are full of coaches. It’s about Manu and I want him to play for England like everyone else does.

Tuilagi’s value for England was never more evident than in the first three rounds of this Six Nations when their midfield had little impact, with fly-half Marcus Smith appearing as the only shining light .

And while frustration grows as the injuries continue to pile up – especially for Tuilagi himself – Sanderson refuses to take a gloomy view.

“When that happens, you have to reframe it in your own mind. What are the positives? What can I control? ” he said.

“The positives are he’ll be back in a week or two, he’s in great shape, he’s positive himself.

“He’s probably in the shape of his life. He definitely has two or three years ahead of him, so it’s only a small obstacle.

“When you reframe it like that, you start looking forward to the next year and a half to the World Cup instead of looking back.”

Asked if Tuilagi would be better served after a long spell in Sale’s side rather than being in the English camp, Sanderson replied: “In terms of being able to improve the length of his career, yes.

“And that’s only because the intensity of training and the physicality of matches is less in the Premiership than it is for internationals.

“The physical and mental tension obviously increases in this environment. Neurologically and physically, it puts a strain on you. That’s the only reason.

“Everyone wants him to play. I’m not saying we manage him better, we load him less.

READ MORE: Is France untouchable at the top of the table?

The article Manu Tuilagi: Sale and England to discuss center management after Six Nations appeared first on Planetrugby.com.

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Want to be a TSP trillionaire? Ask for one! https://athenasite.net/want-to-be-a-tsp-trillionaire-ask-for-one/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 22:07:54 +0000 https://athenasite.net/want-to-be-a-tsp-trillionaire-ask-for-one/ There are many ways to become a millionaire. Some of them are even legal. You can invent something, like fire, Scrabble or potatoes, even if these have been taken. Or you can write a book, then buy TV airtime, then give seminars telling other people how they or they can make a million in the […]]]>

There are many ways to become a millionaire. Some of them are even legal. You can invent something, like fire, Scrabble or potatoes, even if these have been taken. Or you can write a book, then buy TV airtime, then give seminars telling other people how they or they can make a million in the market. If enough people buy it, you will become a millionaire without taking all that time and effort to invest. Or…

You can get a good stable job. Pick an outfit that will last a long time and has a great 401k plan. Very important. Uncle Sam is a good example. And make sure your employer is willing to match your dues. The government matches 5% for 99.5% of its employees. Many private companies have no equivalent. Which is huge. This 5% tax-deferred contribution is a head start that continues. Then, invest in equities for the long term, in good and especially bad times, like the C, S and I funds of the federal TSP. There are no guarantees of gains and good performance, but so far so good.

If you take the Long-Term Investing course, you can, as 112,000 federal and postal entry-level workers did, become a TSP millionaire. Maybe with $2-3 million which, along with your regular federal pension and inflation-indexed Social Security, will guarantee you a better retirement. As in much better.

But the keys are to invest for the long term and do what the winners have already done. Like Abraham Grungold. He is a long-time fed who has found a good financial coach: himself. He practiced what he preached to others. And it worked. He is our guest today on Your Turn (10am EST) here on FederalNewsNetwork.com or in the DC area at 1500 AM.

He will talk about his “simple” 5-step recipe for becoming a TSP millionaire. It’s the one you can’t afford to miss. Tell a friend. If you miss the show, or want to hear it again, it will be archived on our homepage. In the meantime, here’s a taste he calls:

The simple recipe to become a TSP millionaire

“There are about 4.5 million federal employees and about 2% of them, 112,880, are Thrift Savings Plan millionaires. These are the employees who have contributed to the TRP throughout their federal careers and who have invested aggressively. They have withstood all storms and financial crises. They lived through the COVID-19 pandemic and showed no fear.

It is an elite club. And this club welcomes new members.

What does it take to become a TSP millionaire? What is the recipe? It takes a few basic ingredients and several important steps.

  1. Contributions: Put as much as you can afford.
  2. Investment: Invest your account aggressively.
  3. Time: Let your account grow for 30 years.
  4. Ignore all financial crises.
  5. Ignore anyone who is not a TSP millionaire.

Becoming a TSP millionaire or a TSP multi-millionaire has nothing to do with talent or luck. Investing in one of the TSP funds is not gambling. But if you switch from one fund to another trying to time the market fluctuation, it’s just a recipe for disaster. An old friend of mine, who is also a successful TSP member, would say “Just Let It Ride”.

I started at TSP from the very beginning, in 1987. There was no computer technology to check your daily balance. Doing a simple interfund transfer took several weeks to complete. Everything was done manually by sending the forms and receiving your statements by mail. And for employees with less than three years of federal service, there were restrictions on the funds you could invest in.

So what does it take to be a TSP multi-millionaire? Well, my story isn’t just about making contributions and investing aggressively.

My story was about making the sacrifice to contribute the most every day of my federal career. I invested the maximum for 35 years. During the first twelve years of my federal service, I did not earn more than $50,000 a year. I worked a second job so that I could maximize my contributions. I have not deprived myself of the pleasures of life. I continued to travel and play golf, but lived on a budget so I could pay my living expenses. Also, during my career, I have had four TSP loans, two personal loans and two residential loans.

I reached my first million in May 2014. It took me 27 years. My second million was reached in February 2020. So why did it only take six years to get there? Well, I was contributing the maximum to the IRS, including the over 50 contribution, and the stock market grew rapidly from 2016 to 2019. My third million came in December 2021. So how would that have could be accomplished in just 22 months? Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, I saw my account decline in 2020, but it rebounded and skyrocketed in 2021. Also, I continued to buy stocks when the market experienced setbacks . Looking at my account now seems so surreal. Looking back, I made a few sacrifices, but they certainly paid off.

I have many clients who are TSP millionaires and many who want to be TSP millionaires. I always ask them how much risk and sacrifice are you willing to make to achieve your goals? The key to being a TSP millionaire is making those big contributions and investing aggressively.

Financial success can easily be achieved; it only takes a little effort.

For any questions or comments, please contact me at Abraham Grungold – AG Financial Services or my Facebook page at FERS Federal Employees

Almost useless factoid

By David Thorton

In ancient Rome, cheesecake was called “placenta”.

Source: What’s cooking America

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LDH Appoints Melinda ‘Mendy’ Richard as Assistant Secretary of the Office of Aging and Adult Services https://athenasite.net/ldh-appoints-melinda-mendy-richard-as-assistant-secretary-of-the-office-of-aging-and-adult-services/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://athenasite.net/ldh-appoints-melinda-mendy-richard-as-assistant-secretary-of-the-office-of-aging-and-adult-services/ The Louisiana Department of Health (LDH) today announced the appointment of Melinda “Mendy” Richard as the Associate Secretary of the Office of the Department of Aging and Adult Services (OAAS). Richard most recently served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Community Preparedness and Health Protection at the Office of Public Health (OPH). Richard […]]]>

The Louisiana Department of Health (LDH) today announced the appointment of Melinda “Mendy” Richard as the Associate Secretary of the Office of the Department of Aging and Adult Services (OAAS). Richard most recently served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Community Preparedness and Health Protection at the Office of Public Health (OPH).

Richard will begin his new role as Assistant Secretary on Monday, February 28. She will take over from Acting Assistant Secretary Elizabeth Adkins, who will assume the role of Deputy Assistant Secretary of OAAS.

OAAS was created within the Department of Health as a health care reform initiative, bringing together all long-term care programs that serve elderly residents and people with disabilities at the age adult.

Richard joined LDH in 2016 after more than 20 years of public service at Louisiana State University’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Department of Public Safety – Louisiana State Police Crime Lab, and Division of Administration. She graduated from Louisiana State University and LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans with a Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. Richard is a Fellow of the American Society for Quality and a Certified Clinical Laboratory Scientist with the American Society for Clinical Pathology. She is also a Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt.

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Research shows how banks and investors finance the coal industry https://athenasite.net/research-shows-how-banks-and-investors-finance-the-coal-industry/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 06:24:43 +0000 https://athenasite.net/research-shows-how-banks-and-investors-finance-the-coal-industry/ A bulldozer pushes coal on a conveyor belt at Jiangyou Power Station on January 28, 2022 in Jiangyou, Mianyang City, China’s Sichuan Province. Liu Zhongjun | China Information Service | Getty Images LONDON — Banks and investors have funneled massive sums of money to prop up the coal industry in recent years, new research shows, […]]]>

A bulldozer pushes coal on a conveyor belt at Jiangyou Power Station on January 28, 2022 in Jiangyou, Mianyang City, China’s Sichuan Province.

Liu Zhongjun | China Information Service | Getty Images

LONDON — Banks and investors have funneled massive sums of money to prop up the coal industry in recent years, new research shows, backing the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel at a time when humanity is facing a climate emergency.

Analysis released Tuesday by campaign groups Urgewald and Reclaim Finance, alongside more than two dozen other NGOs, found that commercial banks funneled $1.5 trillion into the coal industry between January 2019 and November last year.

The research shows how a small number of financial institutions in a handful of countries play an outsized role in keeping the coal industry afloat.

Indeed, financial institutions in just six countries – the United States, China, Japan, India, Canada and the United Kingdom – were considered responsible for more than 80% of financing and investment in the world. coal.

“These financial institutions should be criticized from all sides: civil society organizations, financial regulators, customers and progressive investors,” Katrin Ganswindt, head of financial research at Urgewald, said in the report. “If we don’t end coal funding, it will end us.”

Coal is the most carbon-intensive fossil fuel in terms of emissions and therefore the most critical replacement target in the transition to renewable alternatives.

Fog shrouds the Canary Wharf business district, including global financial institutions Citigroup Inc., State Street Corp., Barclays Plc, HSBC Holdings Plc and the No. 1 Canada Square commercial office building, on the island of dogs on November 05, 2020 in London, England.

Dan Kitwood | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Who are the main lenders to coal customers?

The conclusions describe all business loans and underwriting for businesses on Urgewald World list of coal releases but exclude green bonds and financing for non-coal activities. The GCEL refers to a list of 1,032 companies that account for 90% of global thermal coal production and coal-fired capacity.

This is the first financial research update from GCEL since the COP26 climate conference held in Glasgow, Scotland, late last year. Campaigners say it is for this reason that the analysis should be seen as a benchmark for assessing the integrity of the pledges made at COP26.

Banks like to argue that they want to help their coal customers transition, but the reality is that almost none of these companies are transitioning.

Katrin Ganswindt

Head of financial research at Urgewald

At the UN talks, major coal-dependent countries pledged for the first time to “phase out” coal-fired power generation and inefficient fossil fuel subsidies. A last-minute intervention to change the terminology of the Glasgow Climate Pact to ‘phase down’ rather than ‘phase out’ has sparked fears among many it would create a loophole to delay desperately needed climate action.

“Banks like to argue that they want to help their coal customers make the transition, but the reality is that almost none of these companies are making the transition. And they have little incentive to do so until the bankers keep writing them blank checks,” Ganswindt said.

NGO research shows that while 376 commercial banks provided $363 billion in loans to the coal industry between January 2019 and November 2021, only 12 banks accounted for 48% of total business loans on the GCEL.

Turów power plant in southwestern Poland.

Dominique Zarzycka | NurPhoto | Getty Images

Among these so-called “dirty dozen” of lenders, 10 are members of the UN Net Zero Banking Alliance — an industry-led initiative that commits to aligning its portfolios to net-zero emissions by 2050.

The three main lenders providing loans to the coal industry are Japan’s Mizuho Financial, Mitsubishi UFJ Financial and SMBC Group respectively, followed by Britain’s Barclays and Wall Street’s Citigroup.

A Barclays spokesman said the bank had pledged in January 2019 “not to provide project finance for the construction or physical expansion of coal-fired power plants or the development of new thermal coal mines anywhere in the world”.

Barclays has since said it will not provide general financing to companies specifically for the development of new or extended coal mining or coal-fired power plants and said it has tightened restrictions on customer financing from the extraction of thermal coal and electricity.

Meanwhile, Mitsubishi UFJ Financial said it has announced targets to achieve net zero emissions in its operations by 2030 and its financial portfolio by 2050.

“MUFG takes its mission to contribute to the sustainable growth of customers and society seriously, and is therefore committed to operating in a manner that is both socially responsible and consistent with the long-term development requirements of the markets in which it operates. operates,” a spokesperson said.

Mizuho Financial did not comment specifically on the NGO findings, but quoted from an ad from May last year which announced its intention to reduce its credit balance for the year 2019 for coal-fired electricity generation facilities to 50% by the year 2030, and to zero by the year 2040.

Mizuho Financial also identified companies whose primary business is coal-fired power generation or coal mining, among others, as companies “highly likely” to be exposed to transition risk. It says it will “implement risk control through engagement” and will not provide funding or investment to be used for new thermal coal mining projects.

Citi declined to respond to NGO analysis when contacted by CNBC.

“Large sums of money”

The study found that it is underwriting that now accounts for the lion’s share of capital that banks raise for their coal customers. Underwriting refers to the process by which banks raise investment or capital for companies by issuing bonds or stocks in their name and selling them to investors such as pension funds, insurance funds and mutual fund.

In the nearly two-year period from January 2019 to November last year, 484 commercial banks funneled $1.2 trillion to GCEL companies through underwriting. Of these, only 12 banks accounted for 39% of total underwriting since 2019.

The headquarters of JP Morgan Chase & Co., the JP Morgan Chase Tower in Park Avenue, Midtown, Manhattan, New York.

Tim Clayton-Corbis | Corbis Sports | Getty Images

Reflecting on the research findings, Ganswindt of Urgewald told CNBC that it’s important to see the big picture when it comes to how banks support the coal industry.

“Ultimately, it does not matter whether the banks support the coal industry by providing loans or providing underwriting services. Both actions lead to the same result: huge sums of money are provided to an industry that is the keystone of our climate’s worst enemy,” she said.

What about investors?

While banks play a pivotal role in helping coal companies get their hands on capital by guaranteeing their stock and bond issues, the NGOs behind the research acknowledged that it is ultimately the investors who are the purchasers of these securities.

The research identifies nearly 5,000 institutional investors with combined holdings of more than $1.2 trillion in the coal industry. The top two dozen account for 46% of that sum as of November 2021. US investment giants Blackrock and Vanguard emerged as the two largest institutional investors, respectively.

“No one should be fooled by BlackRock’s and Vanguard’s membership in the Net Zero Asset Managers Initiative. These two institutions bear more responsibility for accelerating climate change than any other institutional investor in the world,” Yann Louvel, policy analyst at Reclaim Finance, said in a statement.

He added that it was “absolutely chilling” to see pension funds, asset managers, mutual funds and other institutional investors continuing to bet on coal companies amid the climate emergency. .

BlackRock declined to comment on the NGOs’ findings.

A spokesperson for Vanguard told CNBC that the company is “committed to encouraging businesses, through effective management, to address significant climate risks” through the energy transition.

“As an asset manager, Vanguard has a fiduciary responsibility to the wide range of retail, intermediary and institutional investors who have entrusted their assets to us,” they said. “Our mandate is to invest clients’ assets in accordance with their chosen investment strategies and to act as steward of those assets. We take this responsibility very seriously.”

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Wealth Management Apprenticeship Program Success – Show House https://athenasite.net/wealth-management-apprenticeship-program-success-show-house/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 10:52:30 +0000 https://athenasite.net/wealth-management-apprenticeship-program-success-show-house/ From managing the numbers to maintaining the grounds – property management company Preim invests in people through a series of learning programs across the business. As the UK celebrates National Apprenticeship Week 2022, Preim celebrates the success of its own trainees in areas such as finance and caretaking. Now in its 15th year, the annual […]]]>

From managing the numbers to maintaining the grounds – property management company Preim invests in people through a series of learning programs across the business.

As the UK celebrates National Apprenticeship Week 2022, Preim celebrates the success of its own trainees in areas such as finance and caretaking.

Now in its 15th year, the annual theme for the government-backed week in 2022 is “Building the Future” and reflects on how learning can help people develop their skills and know-how while enabling businesses to develop a talented workforce.

Preim, of Peterborough, has invested in a number of employees who are currently undergoing training as part of an apprenticeship program alongside their role with the company.

Among them is assistant caretaker Cheyenne Turbett, based at Badersfield Regeneration Development in Norfolk. Under senior keeper James Plant and keeper John Jackson, Cheyenne has been in a job for 11 months that allows him to embrace his love of the great outdoors with a passion for learning and a thirst for knowledge.

Having joined the company last March, Cheyenne can spend her hands-on days doing anything from grass cutting and planting to handling resident questions. She said: “A lot of my training so far has been at work with James and John, which I really enjoy.

“I can see firsthand how James and John have managed the grounds for nearly 12 years, teaching me how to use all the equipment correctly and communicating with residents to make sure they know we care about their interests.”

Cheyenne combines it at work with a regular college education. She added, “I would definitely encourage others to join an apprenticeship program because you learn so many new things. For me, it has helped me to improve my social skills, through regular communication with residents, and to fully understand how the team of caretakers I work with manage the grounds of the development.

Meanwhile, utility administrator Sam Kevorkian uses his learning to better understand the role of finance teams within organizations. Having joined Preim 10 months ago after completing an MSc, Sam successfully combines his professional duties and studies in a three-year Level 7 qualification from the Chartered Institute of Management Accounts.

He said: “Studying alongside my job helps me deepen my knowledge while applying what I’ve learned to what I’m doing. Since my study day lands on a Thursday, I find coming into work on Friday is like looking at my assignments with fresh eyes. The more I can grasp from my course, the more I am able to fully understand my processes and the context behind my professional role.

“At the end of the two-year course, I want to fully understand how to manage, evaluate and analyze all areas of finance and hopefully apply my new skills and knowledge more effectively and efficiently in my role.”

Prior to joining Preim, Rita Bell worked as a logistics analyst for News UK. Now part of the client finance team, his apprenticeship is expected to be completed within the next 36 months. His collaborative week as part of his role as Service Fee Accountant includes one day per week of dedicated study; whether at home or traveling to London.

She said: “I hope to complete my apprenticeship by the end of 2024. My end goal would be to be able to support the finance function of Preim at whatever level required. An apprenticeship is the best way to gain a qualification while working in the role. At the end of the process, you will have a qualification combined with practical experience. Normally, you will have a professional qualification or experience; an apprenticeship allows you to have both.

David Dunkley, Head of Support Services at Preim, added: “At Preim, we believe that investing in formal staff training is a great incentive for those looking to improve their skills and move up the career path. commitment to development on both sides increases confidence, motivation and ultimately benefits long-term staff retention.

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Researchers use rain simulator to assess residue management – ​​AgriNews https://athenasite.net/researchers-use-rain-simulator-to-assess-residue-management-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bagrinews/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 22:10:00 +0000 https://athenasite.net/researchers-use-rain-simulator-to-assess-residue-management-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bagrinews/ SYCOMORE, Ill. – Energy from raindrops hitting bare soil will loosen soil particles and disperse them, triggering erosion. “During heavy rains, soil particles can splash three to five feet,” said Dennis Busch, senior scientist and director of agroecosystems research at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s Pioneer Farm. “It can move up to 90 tons of soil […]]]>

SYCOMORE, Ill. – Energy from raindrops hitting bare soil will loosen soil particles and disperse them, triggering erosion.

“During heavy rains, soil particles can splash three to five feet,” said Dennis Busch, senior scientist and director of agroecosystems research at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s Pioneer Farm.

“It can move up to 90 tons of soil per acre,” Busch said during a presentation at the Better Beans event hosted by the Illinois Soybean Association in Sycamore. “It is not a loss, but the rain scatters the soil in the field due to the impact of precipitation.”

When this happens, a crust can develop which reduces infiltration rates.

“It comes down to tailings management, because it protects the soil surface from the impact of raindrops,” Busch said. “Cover crops affect hydrology because they transpire a lot of water instead of draining.”

Researchers use a rainfall simulator that replicates a natural rainfall event in the fields.

“We use the simulator to assess production systems for soil erosion, infiltration rates and runoff,” Busch said.

The simulator measures 10 feet wide by 10 feet long by 10 feet high.

“We’re trying to raise the nozzle high enough to create enough energy in the raindrops,” Busch said. “In the field, we try to find a location that represents the whole field with a slope generally around 5%.”

For the study, the precipitation rate is set at 2.75 inches per hour.

“The duration of these experiments varies because it depends on how long it takes to create the first runoff,” Busch said. “Then the rain continues for 30 minutes.”

Researchers collect the total volume of runoff during the rain event and send samples to labs for analysis work.

Collecting data from the precipitation simulator is a two-day event.

“Day one we run through the sequence, and day two we run it again, that’s the data we use for analysis,” Busch said. “That’s how we have consistency across sites.”

“We’re trying to get physical, chemical, and biological indicators by following NRCS methods for soil health measurements,” said Andrew Cartmill, assistant professor of soil and crop science at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. . “We look at the number of earthworms, soil respiration, soil temperature, soil moisture, soil stability and bulk density.”

Busch discussed data collected from a farm in Jo Daviess County that has long-term no-till fields with a variety of cover crops. The four demonstration plots included maize with no cover crop, a black medic cover crop with maize planted in a rolled rye crop, maize planted in rolled rye, and maize with clover intercropped.

“We saw a little higher runoff from the no cover crop plot at 30% runoff versus 25% runoff, and remember that field was completely no-till,” Busch said.

Plots with no cover crop and medic noir had the highest soil loss.

“They had 300 pounds of soil loss,” Busch said. “Soil loss decreases significantly with more coverage at 24 pounds per acre on intercropped clover.”

“There were more earthworms on the plot without the cover crop and that’s not what we expected,” Cartmill added. “We’re still trying to figure out why, but the problem with the worm count is the timing, it’s like a snapshot.”

Soil respiration is highest where there are living roots, Cartmill said.

“Where we have living roots, the soil is very stable,” he said. “There’s not much difference where we have no coverage or low coverage, but we’re working in a long-term no-till field.”

The researchers also talked about a project that included several sites in southwestern Wisconsin and northwestern Illinois. One of the fields was on a dairy farm where corn was grown for silage, manure was injected and there were several passes of tillage before planting. Another field was on a dairy farm which used less tillage, injected manure and a cover crop of rye was planted.

“For the no-till field, the infiltration rate was 73 percent and the intensively tilled field had 70 percent runoff,” Busch said.

There was also a big difference in soil erosion between fields.

“The field with conventional tillage had 1,300 pounds of soil loss, which mirrors what we see in field edge data when this vulnerable condition overlaps with an intensive event,” Busch said.

“It’s the same with phosphorus, there was more than a pound loss per acre in intensively tilled cropland versus less than 0.2 pounds where you reduced runoff and soil loss,” said he declared.

Busch plans to continue researching different cover crops and different management systems with cover crops.

“We’re looking to get the most out of it if you have to prioritize where you’re going to put a cover crop,” he said. “We want to know the return on investment if you have limited resources.”

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Sudan: Statement by Assistant Secretary Molly Phee Office of African Affairs U.S. Department of State – Senate Foreign Relations Committee https://athenasite.net/sudan-statement-by-assistant-secretary-molly-phee-office-of-african-affairs-u-s-department-of-state-senate-foreign-relations-committee/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 02:26:26 +0000 https://athenasite.net/sudan-statement-by-assistant-secretary-molly-phee-office-of-african-affairs-u-s-department-of-state-senate-foreign-relations-committee/ Mr. Chairman, Member at Large, allow me to begin by thanking the committee for your interest and longstanding support for a successful transition from authoritarian to civilian rule in Sudan. We share your concern about the increasingly volatile situation and the risk of regression. Since the fall of Bashir’s dictatorship in 2019, the United States […]]]>

Mr. Chairman, Member at Large, allow me to begin by thanking the committee for your interest and longstanding support for a successful transition from authoritarian to civilian rule in Sudan. We share your concern about the increasingly volatile situation and the risk of regression. Since the fall of Bashir’s dictatorship in 2019, the United States and our international partners have worked to support the people of Sudan in their extraordinary efforts to build democracy. We have worked closely with this Committee and the Congress to advance this shared priority.

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It has always been an ambitious undertaking. After 30 years of Islamist military dictatorship and recurrent internal conflicts, the Sudanese face a legacy marked by a military-dominated economy now threatened with collapse, a civil service denuded following repeated political purges, a political system fractured by military intervention to shatter and divide, and the generational damage done to the country’s historical marginalized is such as Darfur which left hundreds of thousands dead, millions displaced and the nation split in two. Even as we salute the transitional government’s progress in repealing repressive legislation that restricted human rights, opening space for civil society and political activism, ending support from decades of government to terrorist organizations and engagement in free-market economic reforms, we were keenly aware of the immense structural problems facing the transition, compounded by internal power struggles and external detractors.

We were also inspired by the remarkable and resilient civil resistance movement, which achieved the historic overthrow of Bashir and led the security forces to agree in 2019 on a transitional civil-military partnership and a path towards the elections known as the Constitutional Declaration. Sudanese stakeholders also reached a landmark transitional power-sharing agreement for historically marginalized regions known as the 2020 Juba Peace Agreement. These two documents offered the promise of finally achieving democracy and thus peace. for Sudan. We were proud to work with Congress and our international partners to leverage our diplomacy and assistance to support this transition, which holds so much promise for the Sudanese people, the region and the continent.

On October 25, as we all know, the Sudanese security services turned the civil-military partnership upside down when they betrayed the transition and the people of Sudan by directly seizing power – overthrowing the prime minister and the cabinet and undermining the confidence of the Sudanese people in the promise of the transition and the goodwill of the international community. The November 21 political agreement that restored Prime Minister Hamdok to office failed because it did not include key civilian stakeholders and did not permanently end military repression and violence against civil protests. Prime Minister Hamdok’s decision to step down on January 2 shocked the Sudanese political system and prompted civilian and military actors to seek help from the international community to save the transition.

Given the repeated disturbing actions of the Sudanese security services, the people of Sudan have concluded that it is no longer realistic to view Sudan’s transition as a partnership with the military. Declaration and the Juba Peace Agreement to ensure that these policy documents reflect the needs of the present moment. To do this, Sudanese stakeholders are demanding a new military-civilian relationship, one that redefines and resizes the role of the military from partner in a transitional government to participant in the transitional process. For our part, we have made it clear that we support civilians in achieving this ambition and will act to facilitate this change.

Sudanese stakeholders from all military and political backgrounds tell us that they are seeking to return to a transition, but would welcome international support to help them find common ground. Sudan-led political process, the international community has begun to work actively with Sudanese civilian stakeholders to build consensus around a common vision for reform of the constitutional declaration in order to reshape the path of civilian transition, d assign an appropriate participatory role to the security services, set up a Legislative Council and lay the necessary foundations to advance elections, economic reforms, accountability and the implementation of the Juba Peace Agreement.

Mandated by the Security Council to use its good offices in favor of the transition, UNITAMS will be in the lead but not alone. The United States, together with Friends of Sudan (Canada, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, Kuwait, Netherlands, Norway, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Spain, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, the United States, the African Union, the European Union, the League of Arab States and the United Nations) – pledged our full support for the process facilitated by the UNITAMS. We did so with full recognition of the difficult work facing the Sudanese and their regional and international partners. Successful democratic transitions require broad agreement among multiple stakeholders in the capital and across the country. It will take the contribution of many people to meet this daunting challenge. We stand ready not only to provide diplomatic and financial support to this effort, but also to work closely with UNITAMS leadership and key international partners – in particular the African Union, European Union and Saudi Arabia. – to shape this process to ensure that it is time-bound and produces concrete results.

During my two visits to Sudan, civilian and military actors expressed a strong desire to find a way out of the quagmire that has plagued the country since the October 25 military coup. Although they pledged to support the political process facilitated by UNITAMS, these promises must be honored by deeds, in particular on the part of the security services. On behalf of the United States, I have made it clear that the continuing reprehensible pattern of violence against peaceful protesters that the security services have engaged in since October 25 must end. The same goes for the use of detentions of civil society activists, media shutdowns, attacks on medical facilities and communication blackouts. These actions perpetuate a cycle of violence that hardens positions and makes it all the more difficult to agree on a political path forward.

We have already worked with our partners in the international community to impose significant costs on the Sudanese military regime for its actions on October 25. The pause in bilateral and multilateral government aid and debt relief has left the country’s finances in a precarious state, unable to meet its current financial obligations. We have been clear that the only path to the restoration of international financial assistance is based on an end to violence and the restoration of democratic transition.

At the same time, as I have made clear to military leaders, we stand ready, together with our partners, to apply additional costs if the current pattern of violence continues. We are currently examining the full range of traditional and non-traditional tools at our disposal in order to further reduce the funds available to the Sudanese military regime, isolate its military-controlled companies and increase reputational risk for anyone who chooses to continue to engage in “business as usual” with the Sudanese security services and their economic enterprises. Smart use of this leverage will enable us to push for behavioral change on the part of security sector leaders and could contribute to establishing the military-civilian balance of power in Sudan, a prerequisite to the long-term success of its democracy.