assistant professor – Athena Site http://athenasite.net/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 00:33:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://athenasite.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-1-120x120.png assistant professor – Athena Site http://athenasite.net/ 32 32 How to help your 3PLs better manage returns https://athenasite.net/how-to-help-your-3pls-better-manage-returns/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 21:49:40 +0000 https://athenasite.net/how-to-help-your-3pls-better-manage-returns/ By By Dan Pellathy, Ivan Russo and Ayman Omar · March 4, 2022 Over the past decade, 3PLs have honed their reverse logistics capabilities across many industries. But most companies don’t leverage that experience to spot opportunities for improvement. On the contrary, companies tend to micromanage their 3PLs through tight metrics and tight tolerances. As […]]]>

By ·

Over the past decade, 3PLs have honed their reverse logistics capabilities across many industries. But most companies don’t leverage that experience to spot opportunities for improvement. On the contrary, companies tend to micromanage their 3PLs through tight metrics and tight tolerances. As a result, 3PLs end up operating according to rigid scorecards rather than looking for ways to improve the system.

Conversely, companies that give their 3PLs greater control over reverse processes actually reap system-wide benefits in the form of reduced complexity, greater responsiveness to emerging issues, and , ultimately improving customer performance.

Our research shows that a similar pattern occurs when companies focus on return transaction management rather than 3PL relationship management. Typically, 3PLs seek to deepen relationships with customers by providing value-added services that go beyond the formal framework of the outsourcing engagement. For example, one 3PL we spoke with was very responsive to specific and often complex client requests that arose when the pair first started working together. This responsiveness paid off as the client turned to them to lead several strategic initiatives related to returns management.

More often, however, companies are so focused on tracking transactions that they fail to recognize and reward the special efforts of their 3PLs. In another instance, a 3PL proactively suggested changes to accommodate a decision to insource several highly complex products. Because the proposal was not part of the structured process established by the client, it did not receive a proper hearing. The insourcing decision moved forward, adding complexity to the supply chain and ultimately undermining the efficiency goals the customer had hoped to achieve.

The example above illustrates one final point. Companies need to be open to changing their view of returns. Companies that get the most out of their 3PLs are able to expand their initial understanding of returns management to consider a wide range of reverse solutions. Indeed, we found that companies that expanded their understanding of the value that can be created from reverse operations – and were willing to give control to their 3PL partners to execute innovative solutions – were able to develop new approaches. to handle both forward and reverse flows. as an integrated whole.

Imagine looking at returns not as a cost of doing business, but as an opportunity to grow customer relationships and improve downstream logistics. It can, but only if companies are willing to be open to new ideas and let their 3PL partners drive.

About the authors: Dan Pellathy, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at Seidman College of Business at Grand Valley State University and a research fellow at the Global Supply Chain Institute at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville. He can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Ivan Russo, Ph.D., is a professor of logistics and supply chain management at the University of Verona, Italy. He can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Ayman Omar, Ph.D., is Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Analytics and Associate Dean of Graduate Programs and Student Services at Kogod School of Business, American University. He can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).






March 4, 2022


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Researchers use rain simulator to assess residue management – ​​AgriNews https://athenasite.net/researchers-use-rain-simulator-to-assess-residue-management-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bagrinews/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 22:10:00 +0000 https://athenasite.net/researchers-use-rain-simulator-to-assess-residue-management-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bagrinews/ SYCOMORE, Ill. – Energy from raindrops hitting bare soil will loosen soil particles and disperse them, triggering erosion. “During heavy rains, soil particles can splash three to five feet,” said Dennis Busch, senior scientist and director of agroecosystems research at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s Pioneer Farm. “It can move up to 90 tons of soil […]]]>

SYCOMORE, Ill. – Energy from raindrops hitting bare soil will loosen soil particles and disperse them, triggering erosion.

“During heavy rains, soil particles can splash three to five feet,” said Dennis Busch, senior scientist and director of agroecosystems research at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s Pioneer Farm.

“It can move up to 90 tons of soil per acre,” Busch said during a presentation at the Better Beans event hosted by the Illinois Soybean Association in Sycamore. “It is not a loss, but the rain scatters the soil in the field due to the impact of precipitation.”

When this happens, a crust can develop which reduces infiltration rates.

“It comes down to tailings management, because it protects the soil surface from the impact of raindrops,” Busch said. “Cover crops affect hydrology because they transpire a lot of water instead of draining.”

Researchers use a rainfall simulator that replicates a natural rainfall event in the fields.

“We use the simulator to assess production systems for soil erosion, infiltration rates and runoff,” Busch said.

The simulator measures 10 feet wide by 10 feet long by 10 feet high.

“We’re trying to raise the nozzle high enough to create enough energy in the raindrops,” Busch said. “In the field, we try to find a location that represents the whole field with a slope generally around 5%.”

For the study, the precipitation rate is set at 2.75 inches per hour.

“The duration of these experiments varies because it depends on how long it takes to create the first runoff,” Busch said. “Then the rain continues for 30 minutes.”

Researchers collect the total volume of runoff during the rain event and send samples to labs for analysis work.

Collecting data from the precipitation simulator is a two-day event.

“Day one we run through the sequence, and day two we run it again, that’s the data we use for analysis,” Busch said. “That’s how we have consistency across sites.”

“We’re trying to get physical, chemical, and biological indicators by following NRCS methods for soil health measurements,” said Andrew Cartmill, assistant professor of soil and crop science at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. . “We look at the number of earthworms, soil respiration, soil temperature, soil moisture, soil stability and bulk density.”

Busch discussed data collected from a farm in Jo Daviess County that has long-term no-till fields with a variety of cover crops. The four demonstration plots included maize with no cover crop, a black medic cover crop with maize planted in a rolled rye crop, maize planted in rolled rye, and maize with clover intercropped.

“We saw a little higher runoff from the no cover crop plot at 30% runoff versus 25% runoff, and remember that field was completely no-till,” Busch said.

Plots with no cover crop and medic noir had the highest soil loss.

“They had 300 pounds of soil loss,” Busch said. “Soil loss decreases significantly with more coverage at 24 pounds per acre on intercropped clover.”

“There were more earthworms on the plot without the cover crop and that’s not what we expected,” Cartmill added. “We’re still trying to figure out why, but the problem with the worm count is the timing, it’s like a snapshot.”

Soil respiration is highest where there are living roots, Cartmill said.

“Where we have living roots, the soil is very stable,” he said. “There’s not much difference where we have no coverage or low coverage, but we’re working in a long-term no-till field.”

The researchers also talked about a project that included several sites in southwestern Wisconsin and northwestern Illinois. One of the fields was on a dairy farm where corn was grown for silage, manure was injected and there were several passes of tillage before planting. Another field was on a dairy farm which used less tillage, injected manure and a cover crop of rye was planted.

“For the no-till field, the infiltration rate was 73 percent and the intensively tilled field had 70 percent runoff,” Busch said.

There was also a big difference in soil erosion between fields.

“The field with conventional tillage had 1,300 pounds of soil loss, which mirrors what we see in field edge data when this vulnerable condition overlaps with an intensive event,” Busch said.

“It’s the same with phosphorus, there was more than a pound loss per acre in intensively tilled cropland versus less than 0.2 pounds where you reduced runoff and soil loss,” said he declared.

Busch plans to continue researching different cover crops and different management systems with cover crops.

“We’re looking to get the most out of it if you have to prioritize where you’re going to put a cover crop,” he said. “We want to know the return on investment if you have limited resources.”

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Improving Livestock Management Starts with Collecting Calving Data – Wyoming Livestock Roundup https://athenasite.net/improving-livestock-management-starts-with-collecting-calving-data-wyoming-livestock-roundup/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 23:07:16 +0000 https://athenasite.net/improving-livestock-management-starts-with-collecting-calving-data-wyoming-livestock-roundup/ Calving season is a stressful time of year for many producers, and collecting data can sometimes seem like a daunting task. The Beef Cattle Research Council hosted a webinar on January 12 to discuss issues worth spending valuable time on and tools to make data collection easier. Assistant Professor of Bovine Health Management at the […]]]>

Calving season is a stressful time of year for many producers, and collecting data can sometimes seem like a daunting task. The Beef Cattle Research Council hosted a webinar on January 12 to discuss issues worth spending valuable time on and tools to make data collection easier.

Assistant Professor of Bovine Health Management at the University of Calgary, Dr. Jennifer Pearson advocates the use of proper data collection during the calving season. She says collecting data helps producers monitor inventory and production, investigate herd problems, look for areas of improvement and monitor management changes.

Pearson thinks it’s important for producers to keep records to determine if they’re having problems with individual cows.

“Relying on our memory isn’t always best when we’re trying to make some of these management decisions,” she says.

Pearson urges growers to set “SMART” goals when initially approaching the task of data collection. Goals should be specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and time-bound.

She believes that how producers collect data determines their performance.

“Input good data and you’ll get reliable results in the end,” says Pearson.

How and what to collect

Pearson conducted a comparative calving study through the Canadian Cow-Calf Surveillance Network to determine which data collection methods were most common among Canadian producers. She says benchmark numbers like these can be used as a comparison tool for growers to see where they stand in the region.

“Benchmarking is a great orientation tool, but it’s not an end goal,” she says. “We can always do better.”

Of the 100 producers surveyed, 58% only used paper records, 37% used paper and then transferred them to the computer, and 6% only used a computer or portable device to record data.

Pearson notes that there’s nothing wrong with using paper books to collect data, but it may not be the most efficient method.

“It’s harder to get immediate results when you’re just looking at paper documents,” says Pearson.

The comparative study determined that 98 percent of producers record date of birth, 89 percent collect calf ID numbers and 73 percent record calving ease scores. Birth weight was recorded by 44% of respondents and calf sex, coat color, udder score and temperament were recorded less than 5% of the time.

Pearson says there are many ways to use recorded data to improve management practices. Birth weight data is used to calculate Expected Offspring Differences (EPDs) and according to Pearson’s comparative study, the primary reason producers choose a bull is based on its birth weight.

Birth weight measurement also helps producers calculate average daily gain and determine growth production. This shows producers how efficient cows are at raising calves and how efficient calves are at growing in their environment.

Pearson says it’s also important to record cow data.

“Looking at udder scoring and dam temperament can really impact how our heifers look in the future and how those heifers raise their own calves as well,” says Pearson.

Collection of digital data

Mark Hoimyr, owner and operator of Box H Farm, a cow/calf operation in Saskatchewan, Canada, shares his experience collecting calving data on an iPhone.

Hoimyr, like most producers, started by writing in a paper calving book to collect data. He transferred the data to spreadsheets once they had all been collected.

“It just had to be a little more than I thought it would be worth in terms of how long it took to record everything,” says Hoimyr.

He started noticing transcription errors when transferring information from the paper book to the spreadsheets.

Hoimyr switched to digital data collection 10 years ago, and he currently uses the Numbers app on his iPhone to collect data. He describes this app as “Apple’s version of Excel spreadsheets.”

The app helps Hoimyr stay organized and de-clutter. Numbers makes it easy to enter information quickly, giving users the ability to pre-enter cow tags and set defaults in the spreadsheet to speed up the process.

“It’s really quick to use once you set it up,” says Hoimyr.

The numbers help Hoimyr know how many cows he has left to calve and how many live calves have been born. He says it’s good to be aware of this information as it happens.

One of Hoimyr’s favorite features of the app is that it can automatically sort calves, so he knows which ones still need to be marked. He says it’s a lot easier than scrolling through a list of all the calves.

Hoimyr says that using the app successfully requires basic technical skills. It took Homiyr a while to get down to business with Numbers, but the benefits are worth it.

“Overall, we’re happy with how it’s been able to allow us to keep track of everything we want to track and not spend a lot of time doing it,” Hoimyr says.

Kaitlyn Root is a staff writer for the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. Send your comments on this article to roundup@wylr.net.

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Kathryn Huff named DOE assistant secretary for nuclear energy https://athenasite.net/kathryn-huff-named-doe-assistant-secretary-for-nuclear-energy/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://athenasite.net/kathryn-huff-named-doe-assistant-secretary-for-nuclear-energy/ President Joe Biden appointed Catherine HuffPrincipal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Nuclear Energy at the Department of Energy, to serve as Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy at DOE. In May 2021, Huff joined the DOE from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she served as an assistant professor in the Department of […]]]>

President Joe Biden appointed Catherine HuffPrincipal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Office of Nuclear Energy at the Department of Energy, to serve as Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy at DOE.

In May 2021, Huff joined the DOE from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where she served as an assistant professor in the Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, leader of the Advanced Reactors and Cycles Research Group. Fuel and Blue Waters Assistant Professor at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

“Dr. Huff has been a trailblazer throughout her career as a leading nuclear scientist, and she brings endless enthusiasm and curiosity to her work,” noted DOE Secretary Jennifer Granholm.

“If confirmed, she will continue her groundbreaking work at DOE to advance carbon-free nuclear power technologies to combat the climate crisis and provide affordable, safe, and reliable energy to all Americans,” Granholm added. .

Huff previously served as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Berkeley in the Nuclear Science and Security Consortium and the Berkeley Institute for Data Science.

She is a fellow of the American Nuclear Society and past chair of the Division of Nuclear Policy and Nonproliferation and the Division of Fuel Cycle and Waste Management at ANS.

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FDA approves ‘breakthrough’ drug for pain management https://athenasite.net/fda-approves-breakthrough-drug-for-pain-management/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 20:41:21 +0000 https://athenasite.net/fda-approves-breakthrough-drug-for-pain-management/ Almost every cat owner can remember the sad moment when they realized that their beloved four-legged companion might have entered the final stage of their life. Maybe it’s the first time they’ve been unable to jump up on the bed, or maybe they’ve gradually stopped grooming and using the litter box. Although these may just […]]]>
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USM Sports Management Class Partners With New Orleans Pelicans To Sell Tickets https://athenasite.net/usm-sports-management-class-partners-with-new-orleans-pelicans-to-sell-tickets/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 16:16:58 +0000 https://athenasite.net/usm-sports-management-class-partners-with-new-orleans-pelicans-to-sell-tickets/ HATTIESBURG, Mississippi (WHLT) – Sports management students at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) collaborated with the New Orleans Pelicans during the fall semester of 2021 to learn more about ticket sales. Covington County Hospital closes COVID-19 drive-thru test site in Magee Undergraduates become familiar with ticket sales through the following training sessions: Sales Process […]]]>

HATTIESBURG, Mississippi (WHLT) – Sports management students at the University of Southern Mississippi (USM) collaborated with the New Orleans Pelicans during the fall semester of 2021 to learn more about ticket sales.

Undergraduates become familiar with ticket sales through the following training sessions:

  • Sales Process and Promotion – Students learned about the city’s Pelicans franchise, player updates, sales process, promotions and COVID-19 restrictions. The students described their list of targeted buyers for ticket sales.
  • Role play and cross-sell – Students learned more about the selling process by performing a seller-buyer role-play.
  • Closing the deal and challenges – Students made sales deals and learned how to tackle challenges like top player injuries and COVID-19 guidelines.

Jesse Nantz, manager of the New Orleans Premium Pelicans sales account, said the students raised nearly $ 7,000 in financial income during the sessions.

“It was definitely a tough project for students with COVID-19 protocols in the city of New Orleans. In addition to the hurricane, the students also had to deal with the team’s slow start and player injuries. These obstacles have enabled our students to fully understand the increased challenges of sports marketing and sales that are beyond the control of ticket office staff, ”said Chris Croft, assistant professor of sports management at USM.

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Chicago jobs: Challenger, Gray and Christmas, Kellogg School of Management experts give job prospects for 2022 https://athenasite.net/chicago-jobs-challenger-gray-and-christmas-kellogg-school-of-management-experts-give-job-prospects-for-2022/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 15:26:41 +0000 https://athenasite.net/chicago-jobs-challenger-gray-and-christmas-kellogg-school-of-management-experts-give-job-prospects-for-2022/ CHICAGO (WLS) – The United States recorded a record 11 million job vacancies in October. And that same month, 4.2 million Americans quit their jobs. Some say they are confident in their prospects with so many jobs open there. So whether you are looking to jumpstart your career, re-entering the workforce, or perhaps wanting to […]]]>
CHICAGO (WLS) – The United States recorded a record 11 million job vacancies in October. And that same month, 4.2 million Americans quit their jobs. Some say they are confident in their prospects with so many jobs open there.

So whether you are looking to jumpstart your career, re-entering the workforce, or perhaps wanting to quit your current job, you might be wondering what the job outlook will look like in 2022?

According to Andrew Challenger, senior vice president of outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas, “Employers expect labor shortages to persist, to struggle to hire new people. . , and it’s just going to be waves of COVID, maybe different variations that are going to happen and create short-term work stoppages. “

WATCH: Our Chicago Part 1

So how do employers survive if they can’t hire the people they need?

SEE MORE: Quitting your job: Record number of quits expected to be achieved amid ‘big resignation’ following pandemic

“It really depends on the type of employers here,” said Sara Moreira, assistant professor of strategy at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University. “I think there are employers in industries that are looking for workers for certain occupations. Think administrative occupations, in the tech sector. home, in terms of part-time arrangements. Thus, they may be able to retain and attract workers by offering them this flexibility even without increasing wages or other benefits. employers that they cannot offer these options due to the nature of the job. In this case I think they will probably have to increase wages to attract workers, offer conditions that we have not seen in the past . “

Moreira went on to say, “In the long term, we’ve started to see part of that, this acceleration in the adoption of technologies associated with robotics, you know, which are basically trying to substitute for work. You know, it’s going to allow employers to use fewer workers to produce their products and services. “

WATCH: Our Chicago Part 2

Challenger said some employers are changing the qualifications for the positions they are trying to fill.

“I just spoke to a person in charge of a very large company who decided to go back and look at every position in his organization and reassess if he really needed a four-year college degree for one. There are so many jobs that they know they could fill with people without a degree who might be a perfect fit. So companies try to be creative and start attracting workers from populations they don’t have. may not have had access before, ”he said.

Copyright © 2021 WLS-TV. All rights reserved.

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Rogers and UBC renew 5G research partnership with new focus on forest fire management https://athenasite.net/rogers-and-ubc-renew-5g-research-partnership-with-new-focus-on-forest-fire-management/ Mon, 29 Nov 2021 19:35:09 +0000 https://athenasite.net/rogers-and-ubc-renew-5g-research-partnership-with-new-focus-on-forest-fire-management/ Rogers and UBC have renewed their 5G research partnership until 2025. The announcement comes after two years of coverage on the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses. In 2018, the partnership promised fruitful collaboration for researchers at Rogers and UBC. Moreover, he promised “made in Canada” solutions to everyday problems and investments in new technologies. While the […]]]>

Rogers and UBC have renewed their 5G research partnership until 2025.

The announcement comes after two years of coverage on the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses. In 2018, the partnership promised fruitful collaboration for researchers at Rogers and UBC. Moreover, he promised “made in Canada” solutions to everyday problems and investments in new technologies.

While the goals haven’t changed, most notable this time around was a new focus – made by both UBC and Rogers – on tackling threats to the environment.

“Roger and [UBC] … Challenges researchers at the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses of UBC and Rogers to develop, explore and test new made-in-Canada 5G capabilities in areas such as wildfire management, human remote operations and emergency interventions ”, Roger wrote in a November 16 press release.

President Santa Ono also wrote in the press release that Rogers and UBC “are exploring how 5G technology can help shape and rebuild our world in a way that can have far-reaching positive effects at UBC. and beyond “.

In 2018, the initial $ 4.8 million partnership between Rogers and UBC was aimed at improving student engagement with their technology. This was done by encouraging the development of 5G through different fields of research.

“The initial focus areas of the renewed partnership are particularly relevant to British Columbia,” said Gail Murphy, vice president of research and communications at UBC. “Looking at how 5G can contribute to forest fire management, emergency response and healthcare delivery in remote and rural areas offers new ways for UBC research to help generate significant social and economic impacts for our province and beyond. “

Dr Mathieu Bourbonnais, assistant professor in the Department of Earth, Environmental and Geography Sciences at UBC’s Okanagan Campus, said there are ways to use 5G to better understand the impact of the climate crisis, in particular in the response to forest fires.

“So the project we’re going to be working on is how to use 5G combined with environmental sensors … to understand in real time how fire conditions or fuel conditions change throughout the day and over the seasons. “said Bourbonnais.

Asked about his confidence in Rogers to tackle the threat of wildfires in the years to come, he admitted that while this is good news, it will take more than one company to mitigate environmental risks. .

“The problem we face with forest fires is that there will be no one-size-fits-all solution that will solve the whole problem,” Bourbonnais said. “But the more information we have, the better we can collaborate between governments, local communities and telecommunications providers.”

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A practical self-management playbook for young professionals https://athenasite.net/a-practical-self-management-playbook-for-young-professionals/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 06:04:07 +0000 https://athenasite.net/a-practical-self-management-playbook-for-young-professionals/ New Delhi, November 22 (IANS): A new workplace demands that you take care of your anchors. It challenges you to pay attention to the aspects that determine your behavior, attitudes, perceptions and emotions. At the same time, recognizing motivations, needs and emotions is imperative for personal leadership. It will help you hone your collaborative instincts, […]]]>

New Delhi, November 22 (IANS): A new workplace demands that you take care of your anchors. It challenges you to pay attention to the aspects that determine your behavior, attitudes, perceptions and emotions. At the same time, recognizing motivations, needs and emotions is imperative for personal leadership. It will help you hone your collaborative instincts, embrace diversity, and engage effectively in a professional setting.

“So, first of all, ask yourself how successful you have been in leading yourself in the past. And if you think you are already self-aware, my next question for you is: how far are you- you self-aware to know if you are Simply put, are you self-aware enough, or confused, or right, “asks Payal Anand, assistant professor of organizational behavior at IIM-Kozhikode in” Mastering Behavior – Managing Self and Others “.

“To lead is to take charge of your anchors. It is a question of personal leadership. It is the ability to set a direction for one’s professional and personal life and to move in that direction with consistency and clarity. Leading means taking responsibility for understanding what determines your behavior, attitudes, perceptions and emotions, ”writes Anand.

“It is about knowing yourself – what you want, your strengths and weaknesses, and how others perceive you. Note that it is normal to have negative qualities or traits that we cannot. – not be very proud We are all unique in one way or another, and when I say unique I am including both good and bad qualities.

“The first step towards self-awareness is knowing who you are. Understanding your personality, the right areas and the most critical, to a large extent, resolves the issues surrounding your self-concept and getting to know yourself better. be understood as relatively stable patterns of your attitudes or behaviors, ”writes Anand.

Based on the author’s experiences and his interaction with others, “Mastering Behavior”, published as part of the SAGE IIM-Kozhikode series for new managers and edited by IIM-Kozhikode Director Debashis Chatterjee, explores the backcountry behavioral knowledge.

By applying popular psychological theories, the book helps solve difficult interpersonal and behavioral issues at work, such as personality conflicts, stress, dealing with difficult interactions, and loneliness at work. With technological developments changing the way we connect, the book will provide insight into the real world challenges for developing increased trust, commitment and collaboration within their teams and the organization.

Announcing his release, Anand says: “We have all experienced difficult situations in our respective workplaces. Believe it or not, meeting in the workplace is more negative than positive. And most of the conflicting issues relate to differences in behavior and misunderstandings.

“Bosses and peers are the two most important and useful resources at work. And the book tackles issues like personality conflicts, stressors, extreme emotions, lack of self-confidence, feelings of loneliness, the art of taking peer feedback into account, and more. detail.”

Fun and engaging, the book includes engaging illustrations, experiential activities, a collection of original emails from my students at IIM, over 80 interviews with industry professionals, and a bit of humor. It is aimed at students about to do an internship or to obtain a final internship, new managers, employees who have just changed jobs and managers who deal with young professionals active in the private and public. said Anand.

Anand has been affiliated with IIM-Kozhikode since 2019. She has also taught at different levels at IIM-Raipur and FLAME University in Pune. She obtained her doctorate from IIM-Indore. His research interests focus on loneliness at work, personality traits and emotions.

His work has been recognized by renowned international journals such as the International Journal of Human Resource Management and the Journal of Knowledge Management. She is the recipient of the prestigious ‘The Michael Poole Highly Commended Award for the year 2019’. She is a certified practitioner in personal profile analysis.

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Emergency Management Veteran Jerome Hauer Named Honorary New York City Fire Commissioner https://athenasite.net/emergency-management-veteran-jerome-hauer-named-honorary-new-york-city-fire-commissioner/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 18:32:44 +0000 https://athenasite.net/emergency-management-veteran-jerome-hauer-named-honorary-new-york-city-fire-commissioner/ Former Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services Commissioner Jerome M. Hauer, Ph.D., was sworn in as Honorary New York City Fire Commissioner in honor of his achievements and support for firefighters. Hauer is Senior Advisor at Teneo Risk, Board Member of the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM), Member of the Johns […]]]>

Former Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Services Commissioner Jerome M. Hauer, Ph.D., was sworn in as Honorary New York City Fire Commissioner in honor of his achievements and support for firefighters.

Hauer is Senior Advisor at Teneo Risk, Board Member of the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM), Member of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health Humanitarian Health Advisory Board and Editor Deputy Chief of the Journal of Special Operations Medicine.

In 1996, Hauer was appointed the first director of the Office of Emergency Management for New York City. Hauer was appointed Acting First Deputy Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Emergency Preparedness Office in 2002, where he coordinated preparedness and response efforts, including chemical, biological and radiological. He was senior adviser to the secretary of national security and emergency management following the 9/11 attacks and the anthrax letters.

Previously, he was Executive Director of the Indiana State Emergency Management Agency and Director of State Emergency Medical Services and its Department of Fire and Construction Services, and previously Assistant Director of Emergency Management for New York City Emergency Medical Services.

Hauer was also director of the Response to Emergencies and Disasters Institute (READI) at George Washington University; where he worked with the Department of Homeland Security on first responder training for the National Capital Region (NCR) and was an assistant professor at the School of Public Health & Health Services and the School of Medicine. He has also advised the Columbia University School of Public Health, the Los Angeles Police Department, and the Stanford School of Medicine, and developed the first device to re-inject mediastinal blood spilled after heart surgery.

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